Ontario security guard test multiple choice questions

From what we have seen, most people will pass the Ontario security guard test on their first attempt and some will take 2 attempts. We have rarely seen someone take 3 or more attempts. You would require a 62% to pass the 60 multiple choice (MCQ) Ontario security guard test. How hard or difficult the Ontario security guard test is for someone is also affected by their test taking abilities. The test may be more challenging for those who tend to overthink potential answers or do not work well under pressure. There is 75 minutes provided to write the test which gives you a little over a minute per question. For the scenario questions, the Ministry is looking for what is true most of the time and not for edge cases and less common possibilities.

Before you write the Ontario security guard test you will need to receive a Training Completion Number. In order to receive one you will need to complete the security guard training. Ontario Security Hub is a Ministry approved security guard training entity and offers the online security guard training. We also have practice test questions and answers included. Start your online security guard training by creating an account on our website. We aim to issue all Training Completion Numbers within 24 hours of course completion so you can write your test as soon as possible.

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Anonymous

The security license test is pretty easy. As long as you pay attention to the 40-hour basic training and use some common sense during the test, you will most definitely pass the test.

Some of the questions are basically free points, like it could ask you what to do if the fire alarm goes off, and one of the answers is something like “do nothing”. Some of the other ones are a bit tricky, like section X of the [censored, SFW] refers to what, and those you should know about.

Every question is worth 1 mark, and you don’t lose points for wrong answers (i.e., 0 points per wrong answer, not -1 etc). There’s 4 choices, so you can use the same techniques as taking your high school tests or the SAT (e.g., eliminate the obvious wrong ones, and go from there) to increase your chances of getting the right one.

It’s all multiple choice, so no need to fill in the blank or write essays etc. The 62% pass score isn’t that hard to achieve, in fact I’d reckon it’s entirely possible to walk in armed with nothing more than common sense and general knowledge and still be able to pass. That being said, review the notes you’ve taken, use your common sense, and you’ll be getting that license in no time!

Good luck!

Anonymous

I took the security test a while back. To be completely honest, saying it is easy is an understatement. I was actually surprised by it. Like the other poster said, just about anyone without previous training could reasonably expect to pass with nothing more than common sense.

One common joke, or play on words, I hear in the field is “working in security” vs. “working insecurity” because the requirements for entry are extremely low. For this reason, it’s very easy to let unqualified persons slip through, and this is one gripe I have with how the system is set up. Many of the questions are no-brainers and the passing score, like the other poster indicated, is 62%. For comparison, the passing score for CPR is 70% and many safety-oriented tests require either 75% or 80%. This is one of the many reasons why a lot of stereotypes exist about how security officers are viewed by the public.

If I had a say, I would actually raise the bar so the passing score aligns more with someone tasked as a uniformed authority figure to respond to emergencies that may arise at their site, and oftentimes the first person the public would reach for help.

On the side note, there are no fitness requirements or tests to become a security officer. This may be good or bad, but I believe physical fitness and readiness is a must for any security officer who strives to fulfill their duties efficiently, thoroughly, and conscientiously.